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For Immediate Release
March 1, 2021

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Communications Director
(603) 271-2121 | Sununu.Press@nh.gov

Governor Chris Sununu Raises Alarm Over Blue State Bailout Bill

Concord, NH - Today, Governor Chris Sununu joined a bipartisan group of 21 fellow governors from across the country in raising the alarm over the $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill that would bail out poorly managed states at the expense of New Hampshire taxpayers.

The new federal funding package allocates aid based on a state’s unemployed population, rather than just its actual population – a stark departure from previous relief packages – which is inherently unfair and disproportionately hurts states who have managed well through this crisis with low unemployment and strong economies.

“The passage of this bill would send the unmistakable message that Washington politicians expect New Hampshire taxpayers to subsidize poorly run, cash-strapped states,” said Governor Chris Sununu. “While California, New York, and New Jersey make out like bandits with billions of dollars in increased funding, New Hampshire’s taxpayers are left to foot the bill. This is outrageous, and a complete betrayal from previously written funding bills. I am genuinely disappointed in Congresswoman Kuster and Congressman Pappas for their votes today, and I call on Senators Shaheen and Hassan to immediately oppose this bail-out and do their jobs to ensure relief funds are expended using the same methodology used in passing the CARES Act. New Hampshire families are watching closely.”

Unlike previous relief bills, Democrat leadership in Congress changed the allocation formula surrounding state aid to now include the unemployment of a state instead of just its population. New Hampshire would lose over $233 million dollars under this new formula.

Note: The US House of Representatives passed the $1.9 trillion package today, which factors in a state’s unemployed population when allocating aid. The bill now heads to the United States Senate.

****NOTE****

The Governors Joint Statement Can Be Found Below

22 Governors Oppose Biased Fund Allocation in Stimulus Package

"A state’s ability to keep businesses open and people employed should not be a penalizing factor when distributing funds."

COLUMBIA, S.C.. – Led by South Carolina Governor Henry McMaster, 22 Governors have released a joint statement opposing the new standard in President Joe Biden’s stimulus bill for how federal funds would be allocated to states:

“Unlike all previous federal funding packages, the new stimulus proposal allocates aid based on a state’s unemployed population rather than its actual population, which punishes states that took a measured approach to the pandemic and entered the crisis with healthy state budgets and strong economies.

"A state’s ability to keep businesses open and people employed should not be a penalizing factor when distributing funds. If Congress is going to provide aid to states, it should be on an equitable population basis.”

Governors who joined the statement include Kay Ivey (R-AL), Mike Dunleavy (R-AK), Doug Ducey (R-AZ), Ron DeSantis (R-FL), Brian Kemp (R-GA), Brad Little (R-ID), Eric Holcomb (R-IN), Kim Reynolds (R-IA), Laura Kelly (D-KS), Tate Reeves (R-MS), Mike Parson (R-MO), Greg Gianforte (R-MT), Pete Ricketts (R-NE), Chris Sununu (R-NH), Doug Burgum (R-ND), Mike DeWine (R-OH), Kevin Stitt (R-OK), Henry McMaster (R-SC), Kristi Noem (R-SD), Bill Lee (R-TN), Spencer Cox (R-UT) and Mark Gordon (R-WY).

The 33 states expected to lose funding under this proposal, which was adopted by the U.S. House of Representatives this morning, include the following:

  • Alabama
  • Alaska
  • Arkansas
  • Delaware
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Idaho
  • Indiana
  • Iowa
  • Kansas
  • Kentucky
  • Maine
  • Minnesota
  • Mississippi
  • Missouri
  • Montana
  • Nebraska
  • New Hampshire
  • North Carolina
  • North Dakota
  • Ohio
  • Oklahoma
  • Oregon
  • South Carolina
  • South Dakota
  • Tennessee
  • Utah
  • Vermont
  • Virginia
  • Washington
  • West Virginia
  • Wisconsin
  • Wyoming